courses offered in 2019 Spring Semester  


WALL1790-01    21st Century American Musical Theatre
Instructor(s):
  Jan Lewis, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays: January 8, 15, 22, 29
  Course Time:
    10:30-12:00
  Description:
 
  In this course, we will explore four 21st Century works of musical theatre: "Avenue Q" (2003), "Spring Awakening" (2003 and 2015 revival), "Wicked" (2005) and "Hamilton" (2015). We will discuss both the librettos and music for each of these projects. The class on "Wicked" will include a lecture by special guest Robert Fieldsteel, a colleague of the show's librettist, Winne Holzman; first Fieldsteel will offer some of Holzman's notes on writing the libretto and then he will lead a discussion of lyric-writing using the lyrics from the show's song "Popular". Class participants should familiarize themselves as much as possible with the cds and librettos of each musical prior to the class in which it will be discussed. Please note: each class session is 90 minutes long.
 




WALL1790-2    Issues in Geriatric Medicine
Instructor(s):
  Richard Ackerman, M.D.
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays: January 9, 16, 23, 30
  Course Time:
    11:00-12:00
  Description:
 
  This course will begin with the treatment and prevention of the major causes of dementia. It will delve into advanced care planning, staying safe in hospital settings, and living options. Aging will be discussed from the perspective of the best clinical practices.
 




WALL1790-3    Early Georgia History and Settlement
Instructor(s):
  Johnny Mack Nickles
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays: January 10, 17, 24, 31
  Course Time:
    11:00-12:00
  Description:
 
  Class sessions: 1) The first session will be on Early Settlement of Georgia from 1715 through 1835, the Yamasee War of 1715 and how this war opened the door for Native American land cessions beginning in 1733 through the land cessions of 1825 and 1835. 2) Photography from the antibellum time period through the Victorian period. This will cover the Daguerreotype , Ambrotype, Tintype, the Cart de Visite, cabinet photos and the later tintypes. 3) Why the South took up arms against the United States. 4) Exhibition and explanation of artifacts made in Macon for the war along with antique photography from the time period showing the different materials and methods used.
 




WALL1790-4    Opera; Carmen
Instructor(s):
  Mary Keating, Ed.D.
  Course Days:
 
Fridays: January 11, 18, 25, Feb 1, Feb 2 (Opera at Douglas Theatre)
  Course Time:
    1:30-3:00
  Description:
 
  Mary Keating holds music degrees from Indiana University and the University of Florida. She was a finalist in the Metropolitan Opera Auditions, has sung operatic roles in Germany, France and Italy (including the role of Sophie in Der Rosenkavalier) and sang professionally for 14 years before beginning a second career in teaching. She is now retired, teaches Music Appreciation at Georgia Military College in Dublin, and coordinates (and sometimes presents) the Opera Chats that precede the Met Opera in HD broadcasts at the Douglass Theater. This year’s presentation is George Bizet’s opera Carmen, the gypsy temptress and the soldier Don Jose. The opera is in three acts and ends in tragedy. Most are familiar with at lest some of the music. This is a favorite of opera-goers.
 




WALL1790-5    Jewish Approaches to Suffering in Psalms
Instructor(s):
  Rabbi Aaron Sataloff
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays: January 9, 16, 23, 30
  Course Time:
    1:30-2:30
  Description:
 
  In analyzing and interpreting the poetic literature of Psalms, this course is designed to cultivate theological discussions concerning suffering, pain, illness and death. Given the diverse nature of Psalms and their employment in both somber and joyous occasions, we will focus mainly on those psalms where psalmist ventures to communicate emotional trauma and inner turmoil. In doing so, this course will introduce nuanced perspectives of varying Jewish theologies that each grapple with God and God's relationship, involvement, communication with sentient beings. This course will not concern itself with the question of "why do bad things happen to good people", but instead focus on the resonating sentiments concerning human suffering found in our psalms.
 




WALL1790-6    Meteorology
Instructor(s):
  Jeff Cox
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays: February 5, 12
  Course Time:
    10:00-12:00
  Description:
 
  This two-part class will first begin with a focus on Georgia's most memorable weather stories. The second class will be an in-depth look at climate change and how it affects Middle Georgia.
 




WALL1790-7    Creative Sculpture by JR Bodell
Instructor(s):
  James R Bodell
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays: February 6, 13, 20, 27
  Course Time:
    11:00-12:00
  Description:
 
  A Macon sculptor will take you through the concept, design, fabrication and installation of metal and wood sculptures. Bodell's pieces range from small indoor designs to a seven foot garden portal commissioned in Oregon, a 35-foot metal piece at Mercer Medicine (former Georgia Music Hall of Fame) and large pieces at Wesleyan College and Tattnall Square Park. The artist will present his unique metal-coated handmade paper medium as an added bonus to the class.
 




WALL1790-8    Aftermath of Arab Spring
Instructor(s):
  Lody Odeh, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays: February 6, 13, 20, 27
  Course Time:
    1:30-2:30
  Description:
 
  The aftermath of any revolution is never pretty or neat. The spontaneous outbreak of the Arab Spring has spurred profound social, political, and economic transformations in the Middle East that continue to unfold today. The effects are well-felt beyond the region and indeed across the globe. This course examines the unique experiences of various Arab countries from multiple perspectives- including the historical, social, economic and political factors that shape regional and international politics. The course will analyze how current outcomes unfolded in the region and explores the implications for the future from a global perspective. Key topics such as the emergence of ISIS, the ongoing refugee crisis and civil unrest will be discussed in a multilayered context of U.S. domestic and foreign policies.
 




WALL1790-9    Three Late Victorian Poets
Instructor(s):
  Kenneth Hammond, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays: February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 7
  Course Time:
    11:00-12:00
  Description:
 
  Gerard Mangley Hopkins, A.E. Housman, and Thomas Hardy were contemporaries whose poems reflect the turmoil and stress of the late Victorian period. We will read and discuss various poems by the three writers, noting similarities and differences. (No textbook required; the poems are all available online).
 




WALL1790-10    Drawing: Beginning/Intermediate
Instructor(s):
  Clarence Betleyoun
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays: March 5, 12, 19, 26
  Course Time:
    10:00-11:00
  Description:
 
  This course is for the very beginning to the intermediate student. We will study line form composition and explore different mediums to complete drawings. Subjects will include still-life. Students will need to bring HB (#2) pencil and a drawing pad (16 x20")
 




WALL1790-11    Great Decisions, Section 2 (Wesleyan College)
Instructor(s):
  Vince Coughlin, J.D., LL.M
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays: March 5, 12, 19, 26, April 2, 9, 16, 23
  Course Time:
    1:30-3:00
  Description:
 
  Vince Coughlin, WALL President, is the facilitator for this course. The Foreign Policy Association released the list of Topics for 2019. Great Decisions will be held in March and April and the locations will be available when registration opens. The topics for the upcoming year include: Migration; U.S. Mexico; Cyber Security; Trade with China; Nuclear Security; Overview of the Middle East; Rising Populism in Europe; and The State of the State Department. Class members are required to purchase the Briefing Book, or the Kindle version and to read the essay before class. The Briefing Book will be available in the Wesleyan bookstore in early January, 2019 and the cost will be $30. Make your check out to Wesleyan College and on the memo, line write WALL. Each class begins with a 30-minute video which introduces the topic, followed by a one-hour discussion. Limit 18 members in each section.
 




WALL1790-12    Great Decisions, Section 1 (Carlyle Place)
Instructor(s):
  Vince Coughlin, J.D., LL.M
  Course Days:
 
Fridays: March 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, April 5, 12, 19
  Course Time:
    3:30-5pm
  Description:
 
  Vince Coughlin, WALL President, is the facilitator for this course. The Foreign Policy Association released the list of Topics for 2019. Great Decisions will be held in March and April and the locations will be available when registration opens. The topics for the upcoming year include: Migration; U.S. Mexico; Cyber Security; Trade with China; Nuclear Security; Overview of the Middle East; Rising Populism in Europe; and The State of the State Department. Class members are required to purchase the Briefing Book, or the Kindle version and to read the essay before class. The Briefing Book will be available in the Wesleyan bookstore in early January, 2019 and the cost will be $30. Make your check out to Wesleyan College and on the memo, line write WALL. Each class begins with a 30-minute video which introduces the topic, followed by a one-hour discussion. Limit 18 members in each section.
 




WALL1790-13    History of Railroads
Instructor(s):
  Nicholas Steneck, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays: March 13, 20, 27, April 3
  Course Time:
    10:30-11:30
  Description:
 
  This course will explore railroad technology, railroad impact on business and economics, culture, and influence on War.
 




WALL1790-14    Macon Walking Trails
Instructor(s):
  Jim Ferrari, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays: March 21, 28, April 11, 18
  Course Time:
    3:00-4:00
  Description:
 
  In this course we will explore local trails while learning about the natural history of Georgia. Possible locations include the Wesleyan College Arboretum, Amerson River Park and Ocmulgee National Monument. Please wear comfortable walking shoes during this class.
 




WALL1790-15    Local Knowledge with Ed Grisamore
Instructor(s):
  Ed Grisamore
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays: April 2, 9, 16, 23
  Course Time:
    4:00-5:00
  Description:
 
  Ed Grisamore, news columnist for the Telegraph, will share local knowledge during this WALL class; Macon by the Numbers, Nu-Way, Mr. Doubletalk, and Macon's Cherry Blossoms.
 




WALL1790-16    American West in Film
Instructor(s):
  Matthew R. Martin, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays: April 18, 25, May 2, 9
  Course Time:
    1:00-4:00pm
  Description:
 
  In this class members will watch four great westerns that helped redefine the image of the American West. We will start with John Ford's story of taming the west, "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962), followed by what is often considered the greatest Western of all time, John Ford's "The Searchers" (1956). Then we will move to the counter-cultural "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (George Roy Hill, 1969) before finishing with Clint Eastwood's Academy-Award winning revisionist Western "Unforgiven". Each class will start with a viewing of the film, followed by lively discussion; about 2.5 hours per class.
 




WALL1910-01    Pandemics
Instructor(s):
  Amber Erickson, M.P.H.
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays: April 2, 9, 16, 23
  Course Time:
    10:00-11:00
  Description:
 
  Class 1) An overview of defining pandemics, public health, and epidemiology and their roles and responsibilities at the national, state and local levels. Class 2) History of pandemics Class 3) Overview of current and future threats Class 4) Hands on Experience: Instructor will lead class through a tabletop exercise in an outbreak investigation using a real world example.
 




WALL1910-2    Creole Culture and Cuisine
Instructor(s):
  Chester Fontenot, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Fridays: March 1, 8, 15, 22
  Course Time:
    2-3pm
  Description:
 
  In this class, Dr. Chester J. Fontenot Jr., will introduce Louisiana Creole culture through native foods. Members of this class can expect to learn about the history, beliefs, and uniqueness of creole culture, and the preparation of some classic foods.A small fee for the cost to prepare the food will be assessed based on the number of members enrolled. Prior to the class, a menu will be sent to each member enrolled in the class. Menu may include chicken, shrimp, and sausages.