courses offered in 2021 Fall Semester  


WALL2111-01    Let’s Consider Some Great Plays
Instructor(s):
  Jim Crisp, M.F.A.
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays, September 7, 14, 21, 28
  Course Time:
    3:00-4:00pm
  Description:
 
  Plays under consideration include: Tennessee Williams’ Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (because of its connection to Macon); something from Edward Albee or an overview of pivotal musicals such as Titanic or Angels in America; In the Next Room (or the Vibrator Play); Picasso at Lapine Agile (the agile rabbit); Something from Sondheim and August Wilson.
 




WALL2111-2    Introduction to Human Geography On-Campus
Instructor(s):
  Leigh Villegas
  Course Days:
 
Mondays, September 13, 20, 27, and October 4
  Course Time:
    4:00-5:00pm
  Description:
 
  Are you interested in learning how urban growth, geopolitics, agricultural development, economic growth and decline, population dynamics and migration effect you in Macon, GA or wherever you may live? This course will examine the social, political, economic processes creating special relationships that shape our everyday lives. We will investigate how these processes work at a global scale as well as how they shape the geographics of particular places.
 




WALL2111-3    Introduction to Human Geography ZOOM
Instructor(s):
  Leigh Villegas
  Course Days:
 
Mondays, September 13, 20, 27, and October 4
  Course Time:
    4:00-5:00pm
  Description:
 
  Are you interested in learning how urban growth, geopolitics, agricultural development, climate change, economic growth and decline, population dynamics and migration impact you in Macon, GA or wherever you may live? This course will examine the social, political, and economic processes creating spatial relationships that shape our everyday lives. We will investigate how these processes work at a global scale as well as how they shape the geography of particular places.
 




WALL2111-4    Aviation
Instructor(s):
  Ken Heller
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays, September 9, 16, 23, 30
  Course Time:
    11am-12pm
  Description:
 
  Week 1 - Adam Clark, Dean of the Aviation Dept. Middle Georgia State College Week 2 - Ken Heller, 1st around the globe commercial flight (unplanned) Week 3 - Bill Leachman, Retired Major US Air Force One Week 4 - Dean Adam Clark
 




WALL2111-5    Women of the Bible On-Campus
Instructor(s):
  Vivia Fowler, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays, September 16, 23, 30, October 7
  Course Time:
    1:30-2:30pm
  Description:
 
  Since the early days of WALL, Dr. Vivia Fowler has regularly presented a course titled “Women of the Bible.” Participants have come to know characters of the Bible more intimately than the text allows through the Chautauqua style of character presentation. The presentation has four parts: 1) Introduction to the biblical context 2) Monologue (in character, with only a head scarf for costume 3) Dialogue with audience 4) Follow up by the instructor. Participants are encouraged to listen carefully to the monologue and prepare to dialogue with the biblical character, saving their questions for the instructor after the head scarf is removed. In the Fall of 2021 we will consider Miriam, the sister of Moses, found in the book of Exodus, and her role in leading the children of Israel to the Promised Land. The second is Deborah, the only named woman judge found in the book of Judges. The third is Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, a couple who reigned ruthlessly after the division into North and South after the death of King Slalom. The fourth is Phoebe whom we met at the end of the Epistle to the Romans and a leader at the church in Cenchrea. How did these women become leaders in the particular times and cultures they lived in?
 




WALL2111-6    Women of the Bible ZOOM
Instructor(s):
  Vivia Fowler, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays, September 16, 23, 30, October 7
  Course Time:
    1:30-2:30pm
  Description:
 
  Since the early days of WALL, Dr. Vivia Fowler has regularly presented a course titled “Women of the Bible.” Participants have come to know characters of the Bible more intimately than the text allows through the Chautauqua style of character presentation. The presentation has four parts: 1) Introduction to the biblical context 2) Monologue (in character, with only a head scarf for costume 3) Dialogue with audience 4) Follow up by the instructor. Participants are encouraged to listen carefully to the monologue and prepare to dialogue with the biblical character, saving their questions for the instructor after the head scarf is removed. In the Fall of 2021 we will consider Miriam, the sister of Moses, found in the book of Exodus, and her role in leading the children of Israel to the Promised Land. The second is Deborah, the only named woman judge found in the book of Judges. The third is Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, a couple who reigned ruthlessly after the division into North and South after the death of King Slalom. The fourth is Phoebe whom we met at the end of the Epistle to the Romans and a leader at the church in Cenchrea. How did these women become leaders in the particular times and cultures they lived in?
 




WALL2111-7    The Poetry of William Wordsworth
Instructor(s):
  Kenneth Hammond, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays, September 21, 28 and October 5, 12, 19, 26
  Course Time:
    11am-12pm
  Description:
 
  We’ll read and discuss several of the poems of William Wordsworth, often called the father of British Romanticism. We’ll begin with the Daffodils poem and move on to other lyrics in which Woodsworth presents his ideas about nature and the role of the poet. The poems which we will read include: I wandered lonely as a cloud (often referred to as the Daffodils poem); My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky (often referred to as the Rainbow poem); There was a Boy; Tintern Abbey; Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (often referred to as the Intimations Ode or the Immortality Ode). These can all be found easily on the Internet by simply searching for the title or first line.
 




WALL2111-8    WWI Reckless Misfortune
Instructor(s):
  Christopher Blake, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays, October 6, 20, 27, and Nov 3, 10, November 17
  Course Time:
    4:00-5:15pm
  Description:
 
  A six-part discussion of his book, Reckless Misfortune: The Century We Inherited from the First World War (Mercer Press, 2021). The course will examine how WW1 shaped the 20th and 21st centuries and the legacy its bequeathed even until today. Participants may benefit from reading the book before the course.
 




WALL2111-9    The Voices Must Be Heard
Instructor(s):
  Mary Keating, Ed.D.
  Course Days:
 
Fridays, October 1, 8, 15, 22
  Course Time:
    10:30am-12pm
  Description:
 
  The many types and timbres of the human voice with special emphasis on operatic and classically-trained singing voices, past, present and future. Each session will be devoted to one of the four vocal ranges, soprano, alto, tenor and bass, with a wide variety of examples of each.
 




WALL2111-10    Great Decisions (Wesleyan)
Instructor(s):
  Vince Coughlin, J.D., LL.M
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays, October 5, 12, 19, 26 and November 2 & 9
  Course Time:
    1:30-3pm
  Description:
 
  This course picks up on Topic 3 in the briefing book. Priority will be given to members who participated before the course was suspended in mid-March 2020. New registrants will need to purchase the course book from the Wesleyan Campus Store.
 




WALL2111-11    Landmark Supreme Court Cases
Instructor(s):
  Vince Coughlin, J.D., LL.M
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays, October 6, 13, 20, 27
  Course Time:
    1:00-2:00pm
  Description:
 
  The course presents an overview of the Federal Court system and then considers an example of the Court’s Original Jurisdiction and then race relations, including The Dred Scott Decision, Plessy. Ferguson (which established the separate but equal doctrine}. Brown v Board of Education (which overruled the Plessy case), Regents of the Univ. of California v. Bakke raised the issue of racial quotas in the admission process. We then consider several cases in Criminal Law including: Mapp v. Ohio where police used a fraudulent search warrant to search a home; Miranda v. Arizona, which required police to read a suspect his/her rights when in custody; Terry v. Ohio established the practice of Stop and frisk; and Hiibel v. Sixth District Court of Nevada in which the Supreme Court held that it was not a violation of the Fourth Amendment to require a suspect in a “Terry Stop” to identify himself. And, finally, the New York City experience with “Stop and Frisk.”
 




WALL2111-12    Preserving Macon
Instructor(s):
  Jim Barfield
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays, October 6, 13, 20, 27
  Course Time:
    2:30-3:30pm
  Description:
 
  The course will survey Macon’s efforts to preserve Macon’s historic architecture and history from the mid-20t century into; the present. Focus will be on noteworthy organizations, individuals and events that played a role in the ongoing campaign to accomplish historic preservation in our old town. Included will be notable successes as well as failures in that campaign. The final class will be a field trip (limit of 50 people) to the College Hill historic district culminating in a wine and cheese reception in a preserved historic home.
 




WALL2111-13    History of Selected Hymns On-Campus
Instructor(s):
  Jeff Seeley
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays, October 7, 14, 21, 28
  Course Time:
    9:30-10:30am
  Description:
 
  Have you ever considered what makes a hymn unique? Have you ever noticed the myriad of information on a hymn page and wondered why the hymnal is organized the way it is? Do you know the stories of your favorite hymns? All of these areas will be explored in this study. Everyone is invited to bring their favorite hymnals to class as we delve into these questions.
 




WALL2111-14    History of Selected Hymns Zoom
Instructor(s):
  Jeff Seeley
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays, October 7, 14, 21, 28
  Course Time:
    9:30-10:30am
  Description:
 
  Have you ever considered what makes a hymn unique? Have you ever noticed the myriad of information on a hymn page and wondered why the hymnal is organized the way it is? Do you know the stories of your favorite hymns? All of these areas will be explored in this study. Everyone is invited to bring their favorite hymnals to class as we delve into these questions.
 




WALL2111-15    Archaeology of the Megalithic Era
Instructor(s):
  JoAnna Watson
  Course Days:
 
Thursdays, October 7, 14, 21, 28
  Course Time:
    11am-12pm
  Description:
 
  The Neolithic phenomenon of erecting megalithic/monolithic structures existed around the world from 9000 BCE to 1500 BCE. Their significance varied at different times and at different places. We will explore Gobekli-Tepe (eastern Turkey), the Great Ziggurat at Ur (Iraq), the Goddess Temples of Malta, the stepped pyramids of Saqqara and Luxor (Egypt), and Stonehenge/Avebury (England).
 




WALL2111-16    Great Decisions (Carlyle Place)
Instructor(s):
  Vince Coughlin, J.D., LL.M
  Course Days:
 
Fridays, October 8, 15, 22, 29 and November 5 & 12
  Course Time:
    3:00-4:30pm
  Description:
 
  This course picks up on Topic 3 in the briefing book. The class is limited to members who participated before the course was suspended in mid-March 2020.
 




WALL2111-17    British Royal Families, Part 4
Instructor(s):
  Jan Lewis, Ph.D.
  Course Days:
 
Tuesdays, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16
  Course Time:
    11:30am-12:30pm
  Description:
 
  After the death of Queen Anne, the last Stuart monarch, the British crown passed to Hanoverians, who are kings and queens of German descent, who are the direct ancestors of the are current House of Windsor. In this course we’ll look at 6 of these influential monarchs who ruled Great Britain and its colonies between 1714 and 1901. Among these are the famously “mad” king George III, who lost the American colonies to independence, and the even more famous Queen Victoria, and had tremendous influence on the national and international affairs of her tune.
 




WALL2111-18    The History of the Internet
Instructor(s):
  James N. Smith
  Course Days:
 
Wednesdays, November 3, 10, 17 and December 1
  Course Time:
    11am-12pm
  Description:
 
  The Internet of the twenty first century has changed how human’s interaction to the speed at which news can change events across to the scope of friendships and relationships that individuals can enjoy. At the core the global internet is based on the grid of undersea cables that trace their history back to the first transatlantic telegraph cable completed in 1858. This course will examine what we now call the Internet through the lens of the changes it has make to human society since the first telegraph message between President Buchannan and Queen Victoria on August 16th of that year. This couse will draw heavily on a book entitled The Victorian Internet, by Tom Standage.